Monday, September 30, 2013

The Key to Branding: Evoke Love and Respect

Being a fan of consumer behavior, it is no wonder that I have discovered, having worked with a plethora of brands, that brands should always provide both love and respect for their consumers. Having blogged about my passion for the subject at length, here is one of my favorite two by two matrices on branding.

The key to strong branding is ensuring that it sustains through the test of time. Branded products that rigidly hold on to their positioning, contrary to what one may believe, are not the ones that are most successful. Being rooted in your origins and true to what your identity is different from having the same associations and execution throughout generations. Branded products must connect with the consumers in such a way that they evoke both love and respect.

This is by far the best marketing matrix I have come across, for every product that I eat, use, see, feel and experience can easily fit into one of the categories. It identifies the crux of what I, as a consumer, will think about when using or consuming a product, and ignores other linguistic and technical jargon, by focusing only on my love and respect for it.



Most branded products fall high on the love, but only momentarily, or at most, for one generation. These are fads, which are aptly described as a craze for a brief period of time. Crocs, which are quickly languishing, or AOL Instant Messenger, are good examples. Fads have a short shelf life. True, they are created by the age-old principle to make hay while the sun shines, and if one is content with this, then it is an apt strategy.

Others ape the trends of the present generation, without differentiating themselves from competitors. The many celebrity colognes that flood the market, or better yet, the clothing brands we have, fall into this category; Express, Gap, you name it! [I do quite like some of these well defined brands, but as they say, my love is disloyal to most of them, despite my high respect for their competitive/vibrant/social-media-friendly advertising]. Brands tend to get lost in a competitive landscape, where they employ ancient strategies to offer slight differentiation, without any aptitude for risk or creativity. Whilst not as temporary as fads, they may not garner as much attention. Perhaps the archaic definition of trademark, or related negative associations of the word ‘brand’, are what contribute to this category being low on love and attachment.

Lets not talk about products who, in a perfectly competitive market, are equally substitutable, without offering any unique value proposition. These would be the reason that our grocery stores have entire aisles for things like pasta sauce, or cereal.  Commodities, as the derogatory tinged word suggests, are simply that; perfectly substitutable products. Cost leaders will often lean towards this strategy.
The ones that retain themselves in our minds and lives are those which rise to more respectful levels than fads, and feel closer to our hearts than brands. These, as Roberts rightfully put it, are lovemarks. Despite the teasing compound word, it fits the emotional association of its meaning. I have bucket fulls of examples of these in my bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and garage! But it’s not by coincidence that they make it to this stage. These must a) entail real value propositions, b) retain the core identity, and c) evolve brand positioning to keep up with evolving trends and demographics, as I believe that these are the three primary principles to create lovemarks.

There is an element of cyclicality that I would like to suggest to this matrix. For instance, over time, a fad may become a commodity, or if its execution becomes more apt, it may become a brand. And with the right promotion and product mix, it could become a lovemark. Similarly, lovemarks could topple down as brands without sustained interest. So, in addition to fulfilling the aforementioned three principles, branded products must consistently race on a treadmill, which in turn is on a slippery slope.

Welcome to the world of branding!

Sourabh Sharma, Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering, marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting, he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer, and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called 3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com. Follow him on @sssourabh.

The reports of Market Research’s death have been greatly exaggerated

The market research industry was fairly slow to innovate during its first 40-50 years.

  26 Side Effects Of Having A Type-A Personality

For most of that time, the industry intensely focused on scientific methods and representative sampling.

  26 Reasons You Wish Bill Nye Was Your Best Friend

 Debates raged for decades over the merits of random digit dial versus listed number samples.

  23 TV Grumps With Hearts Of Gold

 Enter the internet.

  Kramer Slide Gif

 People whispered, calling Gordon Black a heretic when he took polling online.

  12 Everyday Villains That Want To Ruin Your Life


The internet bubble burst in the early 2000’s, putting tremendous pressure on corporate profitability.

  pops gum

Many marketing researchers sucked up their pride (and some of their principles) and embraced the world of large, but non-representative internet panels.

  25 Deeply Painful Ph.D. Student Problems (Besides Your Thesis)

"Good enough" actually became the new standard.

  25 Signs You're A Punk Rock Prom Queen

Despite losing what they once treasured, a critical mass was reached. (Well, look at that! A Malcolm Gladwell reference--see him and LRW brain scientist Jeremy Sack at TMRE in October! #ShamelessPlug)

  malcolm-gladwell-3JeremySack_RT                

 …And upon reaching that critical mass and tasting the fruits of new capabilities, the industry gave in and fell in love with technology.

  25 Frustrating Things About Being An Extrovert

Their trepidation gave way to excitement. Their excitement turned into zeal for anything and everything new.

  How Being A BuzzFeed Community Contributor Can Feel 

fMRIs and neuroscience showed up. People ran to them, saying they would replace survey research.

25 Frustrating Things About Being An Extrovert

Then there was “listening” and “communities” and “big data.” Each craze caused predictions that the end of market research was near.

  How Being A BuzzFeed Community Contributor Can Feel 

Our industry needs to stop falling in love with “shiny new objects” and following whatever is the latest, coolest technology.

 

At LRW, we’re not the biggest company in the industry, but we have a mission to link world-class market research to real business impact.

 

Yes, we embrace technology when it serves our strategic so what?® vision. (Soon, you will learn more about our groundbreaking virtual reality work.) 

How Being A BuzzFeed Community Contributor Can Feel

But we don’t do it because it’s unbelievably awesome and cool (though it is). We only embrace those technologies that serve our strategic mission and provide actionable data to our clients to help their businesses grow!

How Being A BuzzFeed Community Contributor Can Feel 

As you embrace new technology, please ask yourself: are you facilitating a strategic vision or following a fad?

  9 Fads People Went Absolutely Nuts Over

Forgo fads (like BuzzFeed style blogs).

About the Author

David Sackman, CEO, Lieberman Research Worldwide

David Sackman has over 25 years experience in marketing and research.  He is an expert in marketing strategy and student of leadership.  Dave is the CEO of Lieberman Research Worldwide and has turned LRW into the global so what?® company, focused on using consumer feedback to drive business impact. You can follow him on Twitter (@DavidSackman).




* Republished from original at lrwblog.net with permission.


Thursday, September 26, 2013

Execution: The Difference Between Innovation Failure and Success

Execution. That one word is more often than not the difference between innovation, failure and success. It sounds simple enough. But the reality is anything but. Without the successful integration of ideas at the back end, innovation doesn't happen. 

With BEI Back End of Innovation 2013 quickly approaching, we wanted to get an expert’s point of view on innovation strategy in today’s increasingly complex and competitive business landscape. We were in luck. Maria B. Thompson, Director of Innovation Strategy, Intellectual Asset Management, Office of the CTO at Motorola Solutions, sat down with us to discuss innovation strategy, execution, and culture. Here is what she had to say:

IIR: What is a fundamental characteristic or skill to lead innovation?

Thompson: Abstract and analogous thinking skills are paramount to leading innovation. In order to coach and mentor others to unleash their collective creativity, one must be able to reframe problems and solutions in generic ways, so diverse-thinking non subject matter experts in the domain of the problem can engage, and bring their creative and novel perspectives to bear on a broader solution space.

“We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” Albert Einstein
IIR: What best practices support successful innovation execution? What typically stands in its way?

Thompson: The key aspect for successful execution on innovation is dedicated time and resources for conversion of the original idea to a commercial high-business-value product or service. In our experience, conversion must be treated as a first-class program deliverable, with time allocated in Program Plans and Performance Management evaluation systems. Our global Innovation Champions all have a Performance Management goal to spend 20 percent of their time on Innovation, which includes acting as evangelists for the best ideas and concepts that should be resourced and moved onto our product roadmaps.

IIR: What is the key to building an internal innovation culture?

Thompson: It takes a village. In other words, you need to have a “social” network of change catalysts committed to the innovation cause. We call these catalysts “Innovation Champions” and “Inventor Mentors.” These change catalysts are role models for innovation and inventing and co-resident at all global sites. They are selected for their past contributions to innovative products, features and services, and have performance goals they are measured on with regard to their efforts to support an innovation culture and to increase innovation yield within and across businesses.

IIR: What is the biggest obstacle you faced in your innovation strategy? How did you overcome it?

Thompson: Time and resource allocation. PDW, Performance Management… but mostly executive sponsorship. Without senior leadership supporting and visibly recognizing and rewarding employees for their efforts in prioritizing forward-looking work, people will prioritize “business-as-usual.”

IIR: What is a piece of advice you would give companies who are creating a corporate innovation strategy?

Thompson: Start by building on innovative work people are already doing. Prioritize the most important and strategic areas and communicate, communicate, communicate. Recognize ongoing efforts aligned with these priorities, support them, and reward them. Help everyone - across all functions- understand how they can contribute to the innovation pipeline – it is not only the engineering or research role to be innovative!

Thompson will be speaking at the upcoming BEI 2013 conference November 13-15 in Santa Clara, CA.

BEI allows you to build your custom experience- from keynote luminaries (including best-selling author Vijay Govindarajan & Google's innovation evangelist Michele R. Weslander-Quaid), to field trips (PARC, Intuit & PayPal), to business cases (Eli Lilly, Coca-Cola, Motorola, J&J, Colgate & more) to learning labs, to full day open space collaborative exercises . You pick it, you curate it, you achieve it. YOU are in control.
November 18-20, 2013
Hyatt Regency
Santa Clara, CA

Download the brochure for full details:  http://bit.ly/18X7HIx
Mention code BEI13LINK & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/18X7HIx

See you in November,
Cheers,
The BEI Team
@BEI_Innovation

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

TMRE 2013: Breaking Records and Making History

This year's attendees represent the highest client ratio in the history of TMRE.  Real take away value lies in aggregating the right mix of people with the right expertise, content and experience.

Don't miss your chance to network with the best in the industry:

20|20 Research
3M Company
7th Sense Research
20th Century Fox
A & E Television Networks
AAA Northern California
AARP
Abbott Nutrition
Absolute Value LLC
Activision
AcuPoll Research Inc
Added Value
ADP Inc
Affectiva
Affinnova
AIP
Alcoa Inc
Alimentarios
Ally
Alpina Productos Alimentarios
Altria Client Services
AMC
American Cancer Society
American Heart Association
American Honda Motor
Amgen Inc
Amway Corporation
Analytics Quotient Inc
Annik Technology Services Pvt.
Applied Marketing Science
Arbitron Inc /Scarborough Research
ARCO
ASBTDC
AT&T Mobility
ATK Federal Cartridge Company
Aviador Group
Avnet, Inc
Bacardi USA
Bank of America
Barilla America Inc
Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Inc
Beam
Bellomy Research
Belmont University
Best Buy
Blackbaud
Bloomberg
Bloomberg Wealth
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Blue Print Research Group
Blueberry
Blueocean
Borders Inc
Bose Corporation
Bovitz Research Group
BP
BP Fuels Value Chain
BrainJuicer
Brand Integrated Consulting
Brandtrust
Broadband Dynamics
Brown Forman
Burke Inc
Bush Brothers & Company
BuzzBack Market Research
C+R Research
C&C Market Research
Campbell Soup Company
Canadian Tire Corporation
Canon USA Inc
Capital One Financial
CareCredit A GE Money Company
CareerBuilder.com
Centene Corporation
Center for Strategy Research
Centrac DC Marketing Research
CFI Group
Chadwick Martin Bailey
Charles Schwab & Co
Chattem Inc
ChatThreads
Chubb
Cint USA
Cisco System
Citi
Citrix
Clear Seas Research
Clearvoice Research
Cleveland Clinic
Clorox
CMI
Colgate Palmolive
Communicus One
Confirmit
Connection Research
Connexion Research
Consensus Point
Constellation Brands Inc
Consumer Insights
Converse Inc
Copernicus Marketing Consulting
Corbion
Corey Moore
Cotton Incorporated
Crimson Hexagon
Critical Mix
Crown Imports
Cuna Mutual
Curiosity Research
CVS Caremark
Dapresy
Darden
Datamatics
Davis Research LLC
Daymon Worldwide
Decipher
Decision Insight
Deep Marketing Alliance
Del Taco Inc
Deloitte
DIG Insights
Dine & Associates Inc
Dine Discoveries
Directions Research Inc
DIRECTV
Discovery Research/Focalytic
DMI
Dole Fresh Vegetables
Doyle Research
Dub
Dunkin Brands
E & J Gallo Winery
eBay
Edward Jones Trust Co
Elanco Animal Health
Electrolux
EMI Online Research Solutions
EMPLOYERS
EmPower Research
Equifax
Erickson Living
Ernst & Young
ERS
Estudio Silvia Roca
E-Tabs
Experience Renewal Solutions
Facebook
Farm Credit Mid-America
Farmers/Foremost Insurance Company
Fashionplaytes
Fast Future
FICO


Fiskars
Florida's Natural Growers
Focus Coast to Coast
Focus Groups of Cleveland
Followup
Forbes Consulting Group
Ford Credit
Ford Motor Company
Fordham University
Foremost Insurance
Fresh Intelligence
Frito Lay
Fuld & Company
Gadd Research Inc.
Gap Inc
GE Capital
General Mills
General Motors
Genpact
Georgia Pacific
GfK
GfK Knowledge Networks
GlaxoSmithKline
Global Market Research
GMI
GMO Research
GOJO Industries
Gongos Research
Google
Google Consumer Surveys
Grendene
Hall & Partners
Hallmark Cards Inc
Hamilton Beach Brands
Harris Interactive
Hasbro Inc
HAVI Global Solutions
HawkPartners LLC
HBO
Healthways Inc
Heineken International
Heinz North America
Hotspex Inc
Hub Media Research
Hylands
Ideas To Go
IFC & Sundance Channel
iModerate
Incite
In4mation Insights
Information Alliance
InfoScout
Intengo
InsideHeads LLC
Insight Express
Insightography
Intuit
InVivo BVA
Ipsos Loyalty, North America
iTracks
JBJS Inc
Jeppesen
JLG Industries Inc
John Deere
Johnson & Johnson
JM Smucker Company
JP Morgan Chase
K12 inc.
Kao Brands Company
Kellogg Co
KeyStat Marketing Inc
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
KL Communications
Kohler Company
Koi SRL
Labbrand
L & E Research
Lands' End
Latitude Research
Lextant
Libran Research & Consulting
Lieberman Research Worldwide
Lincoln Financial Group
Locately
Lowe's
Lufthansa Cargo
Lundberg Farms
Luth Research LLC
Macromill
M/A/R/C Research
Manthan Services
Market Logic
Maritz Research
Market Decisions Corporation
Market Strategies International
Marketing Resources Solutions Inc
Marketing Systems Group
Marketing Workshop
Marketlab Inc
MarketTools
MarketVision Research
Marriott International
Mars Chocolate
Mars Petcare
MAXimum Research Inc
McDonalds Corporation
Mckee Food Corporation
Mckinzie
McNeil Consumer Healthcare
Mead Johnson Nutrition
Meadwestvaco
Meijer
Merck
Meredith Corporation
Meritus Analytics
MetLife
MFour Mobile Research
Michigan State University
Microsoft Corporation
MicroStrategy
Millward Brown
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Inc
MindShare
MindSwarms
Miner & Co
MIT Media Lab
Mktg Inc.
MMR Research Worldwide
MOREnet
Morpace Inc
Motivequest LLC
Motorola Inc
MRBI
MSW.ARS Research
Murphy Research
myCLEARopinion Panel
MyPoints
Napkin Labs
NBC Sports
NBC Universal
NBCU
Nestle USA
Netpop Research
NetQuest Mexicana
NeuroSpire
Nickelodeon
Nike
Nissan
Nutro Company
O2 Integrated (a Gongos Enterprise)
OConnor Market Research
OfficeReports
Oklahoma Department of

Opinion Access Corporation
Optimal Strategix
ORC International
P&G
Panera, LLC
Paradigm
Parker Consulting Inc
Participant TV
Pepsi Co Inc
Performance Research
Pershing
Pert Group
Pfizer
Philips Healthcare
Phoenix Marketing Intl
Precision Opinion
Procter & Gamble Company
Prodata Team
Protobrand
Provide Commerce
PT. Kadence International
Publix Super Markets Inc
Purchased
PureMoxie
Q & A Research Incorporated
Q:Quest
QualQuant Signals
Qualtrics
QuestBack
Quester
Radius Global Market Research
Ranker
RealityCheck Consulting Network
Reebok
Remington Outdoor Co.
Research & Marketing Strategies
Research Now
Research Panel Asia
Roche
Roll Global
Rosetta Stone
Rousch Fenway Racing
RPA
Russell Research
Sachs Insights
Safeway
Sage Publications Inc
Sample Solutions
Sam's Club
Sargento Foods Inc
SC Johnson
Schlesinger Associates
Schreiber Foods Inc
Scotia Bank
Seagate Technology
Seek
Sentient Decision Science
Sika
Singtel
Skim
Sky Consulting
Smith-Dahmer Associates
SoapBoxSample
Society of Actuaries
Soctratic Technologies
Sonoco Products Company
SportsOneSource
SSI
Stericycle Expert Solutions
Sticky
Strategic Research Partners
Stubhub
Sun Trust Banks
Sundance Channel
SuperValu Inc
SurveyGizmo
SurveyWriter
Swedish Match
Symphonyiri Group Inc
Synapse
Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc
Target Corporationc
Target Insights
Teach for America
Tennant
Tervis Tumbler
Teva Pharmaceuticals Ind
TGaS Advisors
The Center for Creative Emergence
The Family Room/Just Kid Inc
The Garage Group
The Hartford
The Hershey Company
The Integer Group
The Johns Hopkins Health System
The Millennial Train Project
The Modellers
The Nielsen Company
The NPD Group Inc
The Olinger Group
The Pert Group
The Return on Innovation Project
The Shullman Research Center
The Stevenson Company
The Walt Disney Company
The Weather Channel
Thoroughbred Research Group
Time Warner Retail
TiVo Inc
TNS
TTI NA Incorporated
Tobii
Toluna
TracFone Wireless Inc
Transistions
Travelers Insurance
Tuned In Research
UBS Financial Services Ugam Solutions
UL Workplace and Health
Universal Music Group
Universal Orlando
Univision
Unum
US Cellular
USC Annenberg School for Comm
uSamp
Valvoline
Van Meter Inc
Vanderbilt University
VeraQuest
Vision Critical
Vital Findings
Voxco
W5
Walt Disney Parks & Resorts
Washington Speakers Bureau
watchLAB
Weiner, Edrich, Brown, Inc.
What They Think Research
Whirlpool Corporation
Wilson Jill Associates, Inc.
Wisdom Professional
Wizards of the Coast
Wolverine worldwide
Wood Care Products of Sherwin Williams
Wrigley
Yahoo!
Yahoo! Canada
Yankee Candle
YPulse
Zipcar
ZS Associates

Download the brochure for the full agenda here: http://bit.ly/19tvwJC

October 21-23, 2013
Nashville, TN

Mention code TMRE13BLOG & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/19tvwJC

Best,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE


Enhanced by Zemanta

Why Mobile is a Game Changer—for Research and Dunkin’ Donuts

By David Forbes, Ph.D.

One of the things we love best about using our MindSight® technology via mobile is that it lets us capture consumers’ emotional responses right in the moment, while they are still fresh.   Research in memory consistently tells us that the passage of time works to distort our memories, so that remembering something for the first time – right after it happens, may look very different from remembering it hours or days later, because our memories change with each act of remembering.

One implication of this is that getting feedback about customer experiences right after they happen can be very important. So, for example, in our recent work for a large Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee, we took to the field and got consumers to tell us about emotions using their smart phones.This client was troubled by a few underperforming stores among his franchises. These franchises seemed very much like his high performing stores at first glance: they had identical offerings, were the same size and located in similar areas. They were even staffed by comparable crews.  And past measures of customer satisfaction indicated little difference between the stores.

To solve the mystery, we sent researchers to study the emotional experience of customers at a high-performing store and at a low performing one.  Over the course of the morning rush, we showed off the MindSight® “game,” and invited them to try it themselves on their mobile devices – what we learned was unexpected.

What wasn’t different between the stores were rational dimensions of performance like how long the line was, or how accurately the orders were filled.  Both stores did fine on those criteria.  What was different was the nature of the emotional experience in these two stores.

Both stores did well on some key elements of emotional experience – fulfilling a desire to feel empowered and achieved – to “start your engines and dive into the day.”  But the high performing store also did well in delivering another “softer” type of emotional experience — the desire to feel understood, and even a little bit nurtured.

At the high performing store, the crew greeted customers warmly, sometimes even by name. They frequently knew what “regulars” wanted, and would start on that hazelnut-light-two-sugars even before the customer had a chance to order it.

At the low-performing store, coffee transactions were less personalized and nurturing, more businesslike and anonymous. MindSight® images chosen by those coffee drinkers to capture the feeling of their customer experience made it clear that they didn’t feel nurtured here. They felt isolated, and in fact, they even felt incompetent (about their store choice.)  These results fit well with earlier work we’ve done in breakfast cereals, that shows us how people tend to be a bit infantile in the morning, and kind of vulnerable – almost as if they are “waking up like infants” and needing to be gentled.

The “no frills” satisfaction of timely, competent service reported in both stores did not reveal the important differences in service experience between the high and low performing stores.  Only a method focused on the emotional experience revealed the issue.  And a method using images to get “under the radar” was likely critical.  I doubt many of these consumers could have articulated the pleasure at feeling recognized and nurtured if we had asked —it’s like confessing that you wish your Mom could still cut your toast in little triangles and butter it just so.

Finally, a method that allowed us to get “in the moment” feedback was likely critical to the insight – measuring consumers emotions while they were still in that emotional mood of “morning vulnerability.”  Cognitive science tells us that memories of negative feelings tend to fade over time (the “Fading Affect Bias”) we suspect that feelings of incompetence, and of being isolated, during a morning coffee purchase are very good candidates to “fade” (as the day progresses).

Our client is in the process of coaching the staff in under-performing stores to add those warm touches, asking customers’ names and treating them like regulars. We’re betting that will be enough to turn those stores around, so stay tuned.

Want to learn more about this topic? Attend TMRE 2013 in Nashville, TN October 21-23. For details, click here:  http://bit.ly/1eV1G5q We hope to see you there!  

About the Author: David Forbes holds a Ph.D. in clinical and cognitive psychology from Clark University, and was a member of the faculties of Harvard Medical School Department of Psychiatry and the Harvard Laboratory of Human Development before beginning his career as a business consultant. He founded Forbes Consulting over 20 years ago as a strategic market research consultancy dedicated to creating business advantage through psychological consumer insights. He has since built Forbes into a major resource for scores of major corporations in the CPG, Financial Services, and Pharmaceuticals industries, domestically and internationally. David is the creator of the MindSight® emotional assessment technologies, a suite of applied neuropsychological methods for understanding consumer emotion and motivation, without the distortions of conscious editing and self presentation.  




Enhanced by Zemanta

TMRE'12 Encore Presentation: Using Metaphor Elicitation to Capture the Mood of the Nation

Stephen Hahn-Griffiths, Chief Strategy Officer, Leo Burnett, presented Using Metaphor Elicitation to Capture the Mood of the Nation at the Market Research Event 2012. While we did a written look-back at the presentation in December here, now we would like to offer the an exclusive opportunity view the full-length session as well.



Session Recap:

Stephen suggested there are six meta types of consumers (based on a driving metaphor):
1) Arrivers,
 2) Engineers (plan methodically),
 3) Lonely Travelers (feel handcuffed),
 4) Easy Riders (middle of the road; non materialistic),
 5) Dismayed Mechanics (need a jump start; something is missing in their life), and
 6) Defensive Drivers (need help/assistance; live pay check to pay check).

He emphasized the need to increase comfort with what a brand stands for, with a focus on participation, motivation, resonance and relevance.

He cited several examples of different approaches companies currently use to increase comfort:
• Panera – creating comfort through quality
• Zappos – comfort through customer experience
• Fidelity – comfort through road to financial future
• Kellogg’s/Frosted Flakes – comfort through rituals/nostalgia
• Jet Blue – comfort via amenities.

We invite you to sign-up for access to view this complimentary, full-length session here. Bonus: you will also have access to additional 2012 videos and the Market Research Event 2012 Executive Summary when you register.


Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The Big Deal about Big Data in Market Research

The term "Big Data" is getting a lot of attention these days in business, but what does it mean exactly? What makes data "big"?

Big Data refers to "data that is too large, complex, and dynamic for any conventional data tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.” What makes Big Data challenging is the volume, variety, and velocity of the data. It can come from any digital interactions among people, including virtual communities, social networks, blogs, medical devices, digital TV, e-commerce, bank cards, GPS devices, surveillance cameras, and more.

At last year’s TMRE, Inderpal Bhandari, Chief Data Officer & Vice President, Knowledge Solutions at Express Scripts and Debjani Deb, co-founder and managing partner, EmPower Research, sat down with IIR’s Marc Dresner to discuss each company’s use of Big Data and its importance.

According to Bhandari, you can think of Big Data as the advent of social media data that is now becoming available, which previously never used to exist. This allows companies to get a window into the mind of their key stakeholders.

“Now, you can look at the data as it unfolds in social media, so as people are sharing their feelings you can try to understand what their sentiment is around key entities that have business value,” he explained.

However, Deb said the challenge is taking the high volume, very fast-growing data and marry it to internal repositories such as a call center, a survey bank, a focus group, etc. because they are all trying to tell the same story. And, one needs to be able to reconcile that story across all of those data banks for each touch point.

How do you do it?

“It’s two-fold,” said Deb. “You have to use technology where it belongs, and then you have to take it the extra mile using human analytics.”

Today, technology can take you about 65 percent the way there, but afterwards, you must have human beings draw the insights of the true meaning. According to Deb, over time this will get better.

“Technology will take larger leaps because this is a burning problem for corporations,” she added. ”Over the next few years we will see highly automated systems that will enable the agile decision-making that companies will be looking for.”

The bottom line, according to Bhandari, is you have to participate. You can’t be left out because it is opening up a whole vista that we never had access to. “If you are able to inform your pricing strategy in real-time and your competitor is not, you will be at a decided advantage to be able to do it,” he said.

Check out the full interview below:



Want to learn more and meet experts just like Bhandari and Deb in person? Register for TMRE 2013 today! Click here: http://bit.ly/18aBpZK


Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmanadCicc. 
Enhanced by Zemanta

Monday, September 23, 2013

Why Mobile is a Game Changer—for Research and Dunkin’ Donuts

By David Forbes, Ph.D.

One of the things we love best about using our MindSight® technology via mobile is that it lets us capture consumers’ emotional responses right in the moment, while they are still fresh.   Research in memory consistently tells us that the passage of time works to distort our memories, so that remembering something for the first time – right after it happens, may look very different from remembering it hours or days later, because our memories change with each act of remembering.

One implication of this is that getting feedback about customer experiences right after they happen can be very important. So, for example, in our recent work for a large Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee, we took to the field and got consumers to tell us about emotions using their smart phones.


This client was troubled by a few underperforming stores among his franchises. These franchises seemed very much like his high performing stores at first glance: they had identical offerings, were the same size and located in similar areas. They were even staffed by comparable crews.  And past measures of customer satisfaction indicated little difference between the stores.

To solve the mystery, we sent researchers to study the emotional experience of customers at a high-performing store and at a low performing one.  Over the course of the morning rush, we showed off the MindSight® “game,” and invited them to try it themselves on their mobile devices – what we learned was unexpected.

What wasn’t different between the stores were rational dimensions of performance like how long the line was, or how accurately the orders were filled.  Both stores did fine on those criteria.  What was different was the nature of the emotional experience in these two stores.

Both stores did well on some key elements of emotional experience – fulfilling a desire to feel empowered and achieved – to “start your engines and dive into the day.”  But the high performing store also did well in delivering another “softer” type of emotional experience — the desire to feel understood, and even a little bit nurtured.

At the high performing store, the crew greeted customers warmly, sometimes even by name. They frequently knew what “regulars” wanted, and would start on that hazelnut-light-two-sugars even before the customer had a chance to order it.

At the low-performing store, coffee transactions were less personalized and nurturing, more businesslike and anonymous. MindSight® images chosen by those coffee drinkers to capture the feeling of their customer experience made it clear that they didn’t feel nurtured here. They felt isolated, and in fact, they even felt incompetent (about their store choice.)  These results fit well with earlier work we’ve done in breakfast cereals, that shows us how people tend to be a bit infantile in the morning, and kind of vulnerable – almost as if they are “waking up like infants” and needing to be gentled.

The “no frills” satisfaction of timely, competent service reported in both stores did not reveal the important differences in service experience between the high and low performing stores.  Only a method focused on the emotional experience revealed the issue.  And a method using images to get “under the radar” was likely critical.  I doubt many of these consumers could have articulated the pleasure at feeling recognized and nurtured if we had asked —it’s like confessing that you wish your Mom could still cut your toast in little triangles and butter it just so.

Finally, a method that allowed us to get “in the moment” feedback was likely critical to the insight – measuring consumers emotions while they were still in that emotional mood of “morning vulnerability.”  Cognitive science tells us that memories of negative feelings tend to fade over time (the “Fading Affect Bias”) we suspect that feelings of incompetence, and of being isolated, during a morning coffee purchase are very good candidates to “fade” (as the day progresses).

Our client is in the process of coaching the staff in under-performing stores to add those warm touches, asking customers’ names and treating them like regulars. We’re betting that will be enough to turn those stores around, so stay tuned.

Want to learn more about this topic? Attend TMRE 2013 in Nashville, TN October 21-23. For details, click here:  http://bit.ly/1eV1G5q We hope to see you there!  

About the Author: David Forbes holds a Ph.D. in clinical and cognitive psychology from Clark University, and was a member of the faculties of Harvard Medical School Department of Psychiatry and the Harvard Laboratory of Human Development before beginning his career as a business consultant. He founded Forbes Consulting over 20 years ago as a strategic market research consultancy dedicated to creating business advantage through psychological consumer insights. He has since built Forbes into a major resource for scores of major corporations in the CPG, Financial Services, and Pharmaceuticals industries, domestically and internationally. David is the creator of the MindSight® emotional assessment technologies, a suite of applied neuropsychological methods for understanding consumer emotion and motivation, without the distortions of conscious editing and self presentation.  



Enhanced by Zemanta