Monday, September 29, 2014

Live from #insights2innovate: AT RISK OF BECOMING IRRELEVANT... A CALL TO ACTION TO TARGET MILLENNIAL SHOPPERS

This morning at Consumer Insights Canada and Front end of Innovation, Jean Enloe, 3M COMPANY, discussed how The Scotchgard™ brand is widely known and well regarded. BUT, only a minority of consumers use it. And among Millennials, awareness and usage are significantly lower.

They partnered with Brandtrust to delve deep, and truly understand the emotional drivers, the mental models, emotions drive behavior after all, among Millenials to leverage them for growth and relevance.

95% of human thinking and emotions happen in the subconscious part of the brain, feelings not facts. No insights, no advantage.

Scotchgard brand managers were re-inspired by the insights that they discovered: a major one was that furniture is a public billboard of identity acting as a symbol of hard work,lots of emotional energy.

Home and furniture carry a lot of judgement, people want to impress guests, want to protect and preserve their furniture but also make people comfortable.

Scotchgard realize they liberate users by offering them a shield to use their furniture free of worry.

They leveraged these insights to reframe communications for Millennials as they buy their first furniture and rebrand as more a "care" product than "protection."

They also created hooks to remind people to reapply the products, it's more than a one time protection application.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.


Saturday, September 27, 2014

This Week In Market Research: 9/22/14 - 9/26/14

Marketing To The Women on Pinterest: Strategies based on statistics

Working 52 Minutes, Taking 17 Minutes Off: Big Data study finds the most productive way to work

How to Use Twitter Analytics to Your Advantage: Exporting and Analyzing

Putting Data Integration on The Menu: How Kraft started analyzing their data and putting it to better use and how it could help you

5 Examples of How Next-Gen Social Analytics are Transforming Digital Marketing

Customer Experience: 12 Critical Points You Should Be Addressing

The Future of Customer Service: Customers want to be part of a conversation with thoughts, humor, and feedback from companies

Implementing Predictive Analytics: 4 Techniques You Should Know

Fighting Financial Fraud: Using Big Data to Prevent Theft


How to Protect Your Smartphone: Tips for hiding your data




About the Author:

Ryan Polachi is a contributing writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Get to Know Your Audience Better with Facebook’s New Insights Tool

Marketers, you’re in luck! Facebook recently launched its Audience Insights tool for advertisers, which was designed to help marketers learn more about their target audiences, according to the social network.  The company stated in a news release, “The more customer insights you have, the better you’re equipped to deliver meaningful messages to people.”

Today, social media allows marketers to reach consumers in a unique, untraditional environment where they are deeply engaged and constantly generating meaningful conversations. There is a huge opportunity in making sense of the social data created by the billions of users who broadcast their interests and opinions across social media channels like Facebook.


Not to be confused with Page Insights, Audience Insights is different because it looks at trends about current or potential customers across Facebook, whereas Page Insights looks at the interactions with your Page (likes, comments and shares). Some ways Audience Insights can help marketers learn about their audiences include: understanding what demographic traits index highest for page audience vs. the entire Facebook population;  identifying the pages liked most often by the audience that has liked the page and; viewing the Personicx lifestyle categories that index highest for brand page audience.

According to a recent post on InsideFacebook by Grant Parker, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships at 4C, Facebook Audience Insights has begun rolling out within Ads Manager for all U.S. marketers, with global access coming in a few months.  


About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.   

Get to Know Your Audience Better with Facebook’s New Insights Tool

Marketers, you’re in luck! Facebook recently launched its Audience Insights tool for advertisers, which was designed to help marketers learn more about their target audiences, according to the social network.  The company stated in a news release, “The more customer insights you have, the better you’re equipped to deliver meaningful messages to people.”

Today, social media allows marketers to reach consumers in a unique, untraditional environment where they are deeply engaged and constantly generating meaningful conversations. There is a huge opportunity in making sense of the social data created by the billions of users who broadcast their interests and opinions across social media channels like Facebook.


Not to be confused with Page Insights, Audience Insights is different because it looks at trends about current or potential customers across Facebook, whereas Page Insights looks at the interactions with your Page (likes, comments and shares). Some ways Audience Insights can help marketers learn about their audiences include: understanding what demographic traits index highest for page audience vs. the entire Facebook population;  identifying the pages liked most often by the audience that has liked the page and; viewing the Personicx lifestyle categories that index highest for brand page audience.

According to a recent post on InsideFacebook by Grant Parker, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships at 4C, Facebook Audience Insights has begun rolling out within Ads Manager for all U.S. marketers, with global access coming in a few months.  

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.   

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

TMRE 2013 Video Released: Creating Pivot TV: Developing A Media Model Designed to Activate Millennials

Karen Ramspacher of Participant Media discusses the formation of Pivot TV in this presentation from the Market Research Event. She discusses the three different approaches they took which were quantifying, examining the cultural, and experiential. Millennials are 85 million strong and are often given a bad rap. They also believe they can do anything.
Sign for full access to this video presentation from The Market Research Event

Quantifying:

A survey was conducted with 3100 respondents and they found that 64% were open to the idea of creating social change. This translates to 27 million millennials that they sorted into three groups or stages. The first is the "allies" which are skewed female and enjoy the entertainment value. The second is the "clicktivists" who are skewed male and take online action. The third is the "new heroes" which was the majority and they are engaged and willing to make a change.

Cultural:

A brand lives in an area where the marketing, content, and culture overlap.Millennials live in a post collapse culture and and seek role models because they don't trust anyone. They are also a positive generation and are willing to clean up the mess even though they didn't make it.

Experiential:

The quest to get millennials was proven to be a difficult one. They have so many pressures and so many choices that it make it a bleak world for them. The caring and doing spectrum covers the amount someone cares and how likely they will act on someone. Using this and interviews with millennials, they found that millennials want to be challenged and believe that companies that do good things are important.

Creating a brand filter was important to Pivot TV and they need to be disruptive, credible, and brave. The mission for Pivot TV was to create social change.

Watch the video here.


About the Author:

Ryan Polachi is a contributing writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

At the Intersection of Art & Science: A TMRE 2014 Book List

Stories are a catalyst for action.

Market research, data sciences, consumer insights and marketing overall, has never seen such dramatic and rapid transformation‚ and the stakes have never been higher. The output and value of our entire industry is in flux.

We've curated this list of 8 powerful books in advance of our upcoming MR event to help you open your mind to new ideas and truly become a catalyst for disruption, growth and impact beyond measure.

The TMRE 2014 Book List: 

1. It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by Danah Boyd  

Boyd’s conclusions are essential reading not only for parents, teachers, and others who work with teens but also for anyone interested in the impact of emerging technologies on society, culture, and commerce in years to come. In this eye-opening book, youth culture and technology expert danah boyd uncovers some of the major myths regarding teens' use of social media. She explores tropes about identity, privacy, safety, danger, and bullying. Ultimately, boyd argues that society fails young people when paternalism and protectionism hinder teenagers’ ability to become informed, thoughtful, and engaged citizens through their online interactions. Yet despite an environment of rampant fear-mongering, boyd finds that teens often find ways to engage and to develop a sense of identity.


2. Different: Escaping the Competitive Herd by Youngme Moon  

Different shows how to succeed in a world where conformity reigns…but exceptions rule. Youngme Moon provides a highly original perspective on what it means to offer something that is meaningfully different in a manner that is both fundamental and comprehensive.




3. The Power of Habit By Charles Duhigg

In The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. With penetrating intelligence and an ability to distill vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives, Duhigg brings to life a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential for transformation.


4. The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human by Jonathan Gottschall 

Stories help us navigate life's complex social problems just as flight simulators prepare pilots for difficult situations. Storytelling has evolved, like other behaviors, to ensure our survival. Stories can also change the world for the better. Most successful stories are moral, they teach us how to live, whether explicitly or implicitly, and bind us together around common values. We know we are master shapers of story. The Storytelling Animal finally reveals how stories shape us.


5. Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek 

Our biology hasn’t changed in fifty thousand years, but our environment certainly has. Today’s workplaces tend to be full of cynicism, paranoia and self-interest. But the best organizations foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a Circle of Safety that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside. The Circle of Safety leads to stable, adaptive, confident teams, where everyone feels they belong and all energies are devoted to facing the common enemy and seizing big opportunities. 



6. Absolute Value: What Really Influences Customers in the Age of (Nearly) Perfect Information By Itamar Simonson, Emanuel Rosen 

What influences customers in this new age? The authors identify the old-school marketing concepts that need to change and explain how a company should design its communication strategy, market research program, and segmentation strategy in the new environment. 

7. Exploiting Chaos: 150 Ways to Spark Innovation During Times of Change By Jeremy Gutsche

Jeremy Gutsche's book about 150 ways to spark innovation during times of change, includes these key lessons :

1) STRATEGY - Turn chaos into opportunity
2) CULTURE - Create a culture of innovation
3) TRENDS - Filter through all the noise
4) INNOVATION - Increase your odds

5) MARKETING - Infectiously market your ideas


Exploiting CHAOS: Book on How to Spark Innovation from Jeremy Gutsche / Trend Hunter


8. Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action By Simon Sinek 

There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it. Start With Why is for those who want to  inspire others and for those who want to find someone to inspire them.


Editor's note:

The noted thought leaders above will share more of their experiences and ideas to explore at the Market Research Event. We hope you can join us.