Friday, August 14, 2015

This Week In Market Research: 8/10/15 - 8/14/15

Here’s something you never thought you’d hear someone say: enrich your business knowledge by watching Netflix! Weird right? But according to an Entrepreneur article this week, there are 12 different Netflix documentaries that will help increase an individual’s business mindset. Among the 12 documentaries listed is the documentary “Joan Rivers: a Piece of Work.” According to the article, this documentary adds to one’s business repertoire by showing how to adapt constantly while also staying relevant. Personally, having not seen the documentary, I wouldn’t assume a documentary about Joan Rivers would help business-minded individuals. However, the point being made about adapting and staying relevant, something which Rivers was very used to, is definitely something that a business must undergo to not only survive but thrive. Throughout the piece, you will comes across many other documentaries listed that don’t seem to have any sort of business-related value, but actually hold a lot of insightful business strategies when explored further.



Entrepreneurs work long hours and torture themselves trying to stay afloat and create a business from the ground up. So why do we still have people who want to be entrepreneurs you ask? According to a recent article on Entrepreneur, there are five different motivations that keep producing the world’s entrepreneurial mindset. These motivations include, Money, flexibility, control, teamwork, and legacy. The one motivation that stuck out to me was flexibility. Something that attracts the entrepreneurial mindset is wanting to work outside of the traditional work life and essentially be your own boss. The other motivator that I can definitely relate to is control. Everybody wants for be able to control their work life and how things get done around the business. Being an entrepreneur and starting a business enables one to make the majority of the calls within the organization. Interested in why these are the five listed? Read the full article on Entrepreneur’s site.


In a recent article on Fast Company, Elizabeth Segran explores what market research can tell us about targeting “mommy bloggers.” “…whatever you choose to call them, female bloggers who write about raising their children are a powerful force on the Internet… there are armies of them.” Following the story of Susan Peterson, a woman who marketed home-made baby moccasins, Segran explains the beginnings of Peterson’s career and how she used “mommy bloggers” to gain attention. “…Petersen would send off pairs of moccasins to bloggers in an effort to spread the word about her company, which she named Freshly Picked.” However, many organizations use this sort of tactic to gain more internet attention. In the case of Ms. Peterson however, she was able to break through that noise due to the relatable nature of her story. The point to this story and the central thesis of the article is to think outside the box when marketing a product to your target audience and find unique ways to spread the word.


Is the world getting worse or are we improving? What do you think? Well, according to an article by Fast Company the world is getting better if you measure it by global poverty, health, and education. However, don’t get too comfortable because extremism, climate change, and inequality are growing. “On the positive side, it sees progress on poverty, school enrollment, mortality, water access, literacy, and hunger. On the negative, it finds that climate pollution, bio-capacity, income inequality, terrorism, and corruption are all worsening.” So what does all of this research mean for the world and how the market will run? Learn more about the possible threats to the market and how this research may impact your business strategy by reading the full article.


Nichole Dicharry, is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com 

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