Friday, August 21, 2015

This Week In Market Research: 8/17/15 - 8/21/15

To begin summarizing this article I am compelled to share the first couple of lines from the article itself because they are too great not to share:

“If you order Man Crates’s $49.99 "Snack Sensei" gift box, it will arrive in a cardboard box that contains a sealed plywood crate, a mini crowbar, and a card that says, "If at first you don’t succeed, pry, pry again." It will not be easy to open. And by the time your boyfriend, father, brother, or other male-person gift recipient has actually applied the necessary amount of force, he will have created "a scene." A crowd of coworkers will be gathered around his desk (because, let’s be real, you’ve sent this potential spectacle to the office), and splinters of wood will sit scattered on his carpeted cubicle floor like small monuments to his middle-America brand of manliness. Hammers will probably be involved.

Inside, he’ll find an array of Japanese candy. And Man Crates founder Jon Beekman is basically already giggling as he winds up to tell me, "The candy guide also comes in Japanese, so you have no idea what you’re actually eating!"

This hysterical lead-in introduces the main topic of the article of how personality of a small business can counter Amazon and its grip on e-commerce. The company being described above, Man Crates, was founded by Jon Beekman in 2011 after discovering the “gift baskets for men” category. The foundation for this organization’s competitive strategy is to give personality to the online shopping experience once it reaches your door. As far as market research goes, 70% of the purchasers are women buying the gifts for men. Clearly this “personality tactic” is reaching a particular audience and appealing to women online shoppers.



This week, the Sioux Falls Business Journal sat down with Erin Healy, a consumer insights specialist at Lawrence and Schiller. Throughout the piece, Healy gives advice to businesses hoping to use consumer insight effectively as well as discussing the most interesting and exciting parts of her market research job. “Something that any business can do is to truly know your customers. Consumers search for both rational and emotional reasons to use your business or brand. Consumer insights dives into how consumers think and helps people understand why that consumer choice was made in the first place. If businesses can understand why their customers use their services and products, it will be easier to establish and build meaningful relationships with them.” Healy also explains how a “good insight” take a lot of effort and time and that finding that insight is very gratifying at the end. She concludes the interview by stating “you know you’ve got a great insight – when you realize it’s not necessarily a complex answer.”



Technology mixed with learning in schools is excellent right?? Well according to some skeptics and market researchers in the field of technology and its “return on learning,” technology and education may not be correlated positively. Rob Mancabelli, the cofounder and CEO of Bright Bytes, claims that “’Over $10 billion is spent on technology every year in the U.S., and the majority of it does not benefit learning outcomes.’" In his conclusions, the data that they have gathered from the effectiveness of multimedia in learning remains very incomplete at its best. This is very interesting analysis as we see many schools and even organizations trying to incorporate multimedia into the learning process. What do you think?



Being an Entrepreneur is hard; it’s even harder if you fall into myths associated with the title. Entrepreneur released an article this week that discusses common myths that can hold an entrepreneur back and not be able to reach full potential. A few of the myths listed include thinking you’re “the boss” and that you’ll be able to set your own salary. “As boss, you do get to set the agenda. However, you’ll also be on call and accountable to a range of different people, including employees, customers, the IRS, venture capitalists, angel investors and partners.” The article also explains that while you may be able to adjust your salary, the cash flow is essential for any small business when it’s starting. In other words, many new entrepreneurs can’t afford to pay themselves much money in order to keep the business going. Read more about the common myths that may hold an entrepreneur back here.


Nichole Dicharry, is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com 

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