Friday, May 19, 2017

Free Webinar: Storytelling with Data

As insights leaders, we are constantly tasked with evolving our skill sets and staying on top of the latest market research trends. The producers of TMRE: The Market Research Event are excited to announce that we’ll be delivering the cutting-edge content and speakers to keep you informed year-round. The TMRE webinar series takes you beyond the in-person event, and is designed for executives with a relentless focus on securing the future of insights as a powerful force for business success

Our upcoming webinar is “Storytelling with Data.” Driving the value of insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this 3-part webinar focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling story.  

About the presenters:

Kelsy Saulsbury, Manager, Consumer Insight & Analytics, Schwan's Shared Services, LLC


Having trouble getting that long report read? People today are short on time and attention and getting work noticed is harder and harder. Infographics done right can be an effective way to get the conversation going or make the key points you need to make. Learn tips for translating data to infographics and how to work effectively with designers.












Bill Greenwald, Founder and Chief Neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group, LLC


Anyone who has ever presented a data-driven presentation understands a simple truism: data alone, no matter how factual or ‘Yikes’ oriented it is, does little to inspire hearts, influence behavior, and/or drive sustained impact. Indeed, the typical data-driven presentation merely ‘informs’ but rarely ‘transforms’ the life of an audience member. For this reason, we are excited to have William join us to share how you can leverage brain science and the art of ‘Storytelling’ to optimize the relevancy and sustained impact your audience will derive from your data-driven presentations.






Thursday, May 18, 2017

Insights Interview: Kelley Styring, Principal, InsightFarm

OmniShopper Keynote Speaker Kelley Styring, Principal of InsightFarm, will be unveiling the insights from the 2017 Second Edition of her groundbreaking 2007 study, In Your Purse: Archaeology of the American Handbag. We talked with Kelley about how the rise of technology has even impacted this ubiquitous, important, yet often underestimated, accessory and how what’s happening in the purse is related to what’s happening in retail.

We’ve been talking about how retail has been disrupted. Has your research found that this disruption has also affected the purse?

Styring: Technology has disrupted them both. Retail and the purse are sisters, in a way. Ten years ago, the purse was the primary physical object that connected the home, where needs are created, and the store, where people shopped to meet those needs. Now, digital has not only disrupted brick & mortar retail shopping, but it has also changed the relationship women have with their purses.  They sometimes choose to leave the house without a purse, choosing the cell phone alone.  Now, that’s disruptive.

So, is the purse being replaced?

Styring: No. If you look at the raw numbers, more people are carrying purses than ever before. But items that were carried in the purse in 2007 – think maps, address books, calendars, cameras, and so forth – have been replaced with digital devices. And yet, the purse still weighs the same! Why? Because people are carrying phones and tablets and chargers and earphones and other related paraphernalia and they are struggling with all that stuff. The purse is still a vital tool used daily by 85% of people, it’s just being used differently.

How are shoppers changing purses?

Styring: Purse design is changing to meet the needs of different consumers. You see smaller purses that accommodate the phone and a few other items, you see more pockets designed to fit a phone. And - teaser - there’s a new group of shoppers carrying a purse that might surprise you.

How are the future of retail and the future of the purse connected?

Styring: The purse has almost become a foresight into what’s happening in retail. How we make the purse and these digital devices work in harmony is analogous to making all these ways to shop work in harmony.

How do you bring digital to bear on the purse, which is a critical item to the vast majority of people, and at the same time, leverage this convenient thing to help with all these digital devices? In the same way, how do we leverage this huge retail infrastructure where the vast majority of people still shop and help people be more successful shopping online by bringing the two together?

Where do you see the purse moving in the next five years?

Styring: In the purse, there are billions of dollars of untapped opportunity for innovation. Many of these opportunities employ technology, such as using biometric identification to prevent it from being opened by someone other than the owner. Some of them are product and packaging opportunities, and some of them provide a better way to transport and manage all things – including digital. It’s really about brands being willing to look for the opportunities and take advantage of them.

The purse, like brick & mortar retail locations, may be evolving, but neither of them is going to just disappear any time soon.

Be sure to attend Kelley’s Keynote Winning in Her Purse at 11:15 a.m. on June 20 and discover how technology has caused far-reaching disruption, even in the most ubiquitous fashion and life accessory.



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Dude, That’s a Purse.

By Kelley Styring, Principal, InsightFarm & OmniShopper 2017 Keynote Speaker

OmniShopper 2017 attendees will get the first look at results of InsightFarm Principal Kelley Styring’s Second Edition of her groundbreaking 2007 study, In YourPurse: Archaeology of the American Handbag. We asked Kelley to share one thing she wasn’t expecting when she looked inside the often overlooked, yet oh-so-critical, handbag.

10 years ago, the last chapter of my first book, In Your Purse: Archaeology of the American Handbag, was titled Mythology and the Man Bag. I went on to discuss that, unlike the rest of my book, I had NOT painstakingly researched men and their relationships with purses, but based on available information, observation and experience, I felt that I was on firm ground stating that “Men, in general, do not carry purses.” Instead, men carried objects used to carry something specific, like business papers, gym clothes, tools or lunch.


 What a difference a decade makes.

Digital has not only changed when and where we shop, but it has changed WHO shops. Because of digital, men are responsible for more shopping than ever before. Men prefer shopping online rather than in-store and make more purchases on their phones than women. Young men, young dads in particular, are doing more of the grocery shopping.

And because of digital, about one in four men are now carrying purses. Seriously.

So, 26% of them call it a satchel and 43% of them carry a backpack. But make no mistake about it, it’s a purse. 

They carry laptops, phones, chargers, grooming items, and whatnot in them. There simply aren’t enough pockets in which to safely carry those digital devices every day, so they get a bag. Since they’re already carrying a bag for their devices, why not throw a lip balm, some tissues and your sunglasses in there, too? And, there you have it, a purse.

For over a decade, I’ve heard many, many marketers trivialize the purse and make light of this research until they hear the numbers, count the categories, and calculate the billions of dollars in business opportunity hiding from them in the humble handbag. It is an important tool of commerce that is vital to the daily life of 85% of people in the U.S.

So trivialize no more, ‘cause dude, a quarter of you are carrying a purse!


Be sure to attend Kelley Styring’s OmniShopper Keynote Winning in Her Purse at 11:15 a.m. on June 20 and discover how technology has caused far-reaching disruption, even in the most ubiquitous fashion and life accessory. 

Monday, May 15, 2017

The Wait is Over. View the Full TMRE 2017 Brochure Today!

The wait is over. The full program is ready - and it's our best one yet! https://goo.gl/ydJwZl

Experience the Future of Insights Live & In Person:
  • 4 Days
  • Hundreds of Speakers
  • Over 1,000 Attendees
TMRE: The Market Research Event
October 22-25, 2017 | Orlando, FL



Brilliant thinkers, doers and industry leaders take the stage for TMRE 2017, from Malcolm Gladwell to insights executives from Twitter, 3M, Facebook and Johnson & Johnson - plus dozens of other movers and shakers!

It's all happening at TMRE: The Market Research Event from October 22-25, 2017. 

Explore the Program: https://goo.gl/ydJwZl

See the full brochure to learn more about every session  and speaker, then start planning your week at TMRE 2017 in Orlando: https://goo.gl/ydJwZl

TMRE: The Market Research Event is an unparalleled opportunity to jump-start your career, build an all-star network and invigorate your brand.

Use code TMRE17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/ydJwZl

Cheers,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE
#TMREvent



Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Insights Interview: Q&A with Diana Powell, Conagra Brands

We sat down with OmniShopper speaker Diana Powell who is a Shopper Insights Manager at Conagra Brands, to discuss how retail is being disrupted.

How has retail been disrupted? 

Powell: In the food industry, traditional grocers are experiencing competition no longer just from other grocers, but from emerging channels of meal sourcing such as subscriptions, meal kits, offline and online wholesale/club stores, and hundreds of new delivery models.  Traditional brick and mortar stores are having to rethink how they do retail – with more ready-to-go options and elevating the shopping experience to draw shoppers in.

How has omnichannel impacted retail positively? 

Powell: We’ve been keeping a close eye on ecommerce and how it impacts shopping for food.  Shoppers view online shopping as complementary to their in-store experience and most don’t foresee it replacing all in-store.  Shoppers who are buying groceries in store AND online spend more overall than in-store only shoppers.


How is this new era of shopping everywhere impacting shopper insights? 

Powell: We must be ahead of the digital transformation to keep up with where shoppers are.  It’s not enough to just send the same old surveys to mobile phones, but we must find new ways to use cutting age big data to understand online behaviors that consumers don’t even know they are doing. Also, with the IoT, behavior and trends change faster than ever, so we need to update research and findings more frequently as to not lag in our reporting.

Additionally, in the food industry, we’ve also traditionally spent our time researching women. However, with equal proportions of men and women millennials doing the grocery shopping, we can’t have blinders to both genders!

How are shoppers shaping the future of retail?

Powell: In food ecommerce, there is a clash between the shopper’s perspective of value and the retailers when it comes to ecommerce.  Shoppers are used to shopping online for other categories (electronics, clothing, housewares, cleaning supplies, etc.) and when they shop online for these products, they are expecting to get great deals.  They have cost comparison sites and aps at their fingertips and are quick and savvy deal shoppers.  They apply this same thinking to their online grocery shopping and expect to find good prices and deals. 

However, food retailers think that because of the convenience of online grocery shopping, shoppers should be paying a premium.  They charge fees for pickup and delivery, charge higher prices for the same products, don’t integrate as many couponing options, and some even ask for a tip for the person delivering.  Shoppers are not willing to pay such a premium (only about $5) and therefore I don’t think we’re seeing the shift as quickly as it’s happened for other goods.  It will be fascinating to see how sites like Jet.com and amazon, which are modeled to give shoppers great prices, will force the traditional brick-and-mortar- e-tailers to step up their price savings game.

Why is it important to link digital and physical shopper marketing? 

Powell: Even when shoppers are in a physical store, they are connected digitally.  Whether they are using their devices for shopping related activities or not depends on the minute! A buzz from their purse or pocket triggers a look, a distraction from the shelf, but also an opportunity to influence.  Of course, we must be mindful of respecting the shopper’s desires for how often/what we contact them about – making sure to give the appropriate value exchange customized to that shopper.

Where do you see retail moving in the next 5 years?  I’m excited to see a nice balance of the tangible and intangible.  I think retail shopping will become more immersive, experiential, and destination-based.  Offering the benefits that are near impossible to recreate. Perhaps even more analog, more customized. People have a desire to disconnect sometimes, and to return to the simple. Or on the contrary, offering high tech in-person experiences that aren’t possible in your own home is also going to happen.  I’m also excited to see the continuation of the tech explosion – with voice search leading the way for a lot of cool innovation.  Deliveries will be faster, subscriptions will grow, and brand loyalty may make a comeback when shoppers spend more time speaking to their devices versus searching through.


Don’t miss Powell’s session, “Knowledge is Power, If You Can Find It!” on June 20th at 3:40 PM in Minneapolis, MN. Use code OMNI17BL for $100 off the current rate: https://goo.gl/XY25DW

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Free Webinar: Data Analytics in the Retail Store of the Future

Marketing Analytics & Data Science speaker Dave Bhattacharjee, VP of Data Analytics for Stanley Black and Decker, was unfortunately unable to be at the conference last month, but he still wanted to share his presentation with our community digitally.

In Dave’s upcoming webinar “Data Analytics in the Retail Store of the Future”, he will outline the challenges for brick and mortar retailers and their use of analytics to improve their business and create the retail store of the future. Brick and mortar retailers are going through a period of unprecedented change. To remain competitive, retailers are focused on omni-channel and the use of the retail store as a competitive advantage for both customer experience and order fulfillment. The focus for this presentation will be the innovative use of sensor and video technology, machine learning and the use of blended data to improve customer lifetime value, marketing analytics, sales lift and margin optimization.  

Dave will cover topics such as data acquisition and store instrumentation leveraging the internet of things. He will discuss advances in video analytics that enable retailers to better understand customer engagement, experience and behavior. And, he will also discuss the use of blending unstructured data to enable retailers to better assess promotions and their impact on sales and margins.

Save your seat for the webinar on Wednesday, May 31st at 2:00 PM EST: http://bit.ly/2p11Lye

About the Presenter:

Dave Bhattacharjee is the Vice President of Data Analytics for Stanley Black and Decker. In this role, Dave is responsible for monetizing Stanley Black and Decker’s data assets. His current projects include analytics applications for physical security, retail, healthcare, smart factory and marketing.    
Prior to Stanley Black and Decker, Dave was at Cisco Systems where as Managing Director, Dave managed and led Cisco’s consulting services for analytics and big data in the Americas. He has also held leadership positions at IBM and PriceWaterhouseCoopers where Dave worked with the Fortune 500 on large scale initiatives designed to create business value through data and technology. He has an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin and a Bachelors in Computer Science and Engineering from Arizona State University.   


Cheers,
The Marketing Analytics & Data Science Team


Thursday, April 27, 2017

Study Compares Recall Versus In-the-Moment Surveys

This post was originally published on mfour’s Blog.

If you want to know what consumers buy, you’d better not hesitate to ask. Because if you don’t ask fast enough, your data will fall into a recall gap – the chasm that opens when you rely on days-old (or weeks-old) memories instead of capturing consumer sentiment when the experience is fresh in mind. 
That’s the takeaway from a comparative study MFour conducted to explore how memory decay impacts data reliability. The results underscore how using GPS-enabled technology lets you reach the right consumers in the right place at the right time for insights that can truly drive the right business decisions. 


The study involved fielding essentially the same mobile survey to two demographically similar groups of 200 consumers. GeoLocation told us that our first group had been shopping that very day in at least one of the five retailer categories in the study – grocery stores, convenience stores, drug stores, membership club stores, and mass merchants. 

These panelists were identified inside specific stores and received in-app push notifications just as they walked out the door to learn about their shopping experiences. The non-GeoLocated control group was asked about most recent shopping experiences in the same store types – which may have occurred days, weeks, or even months earlier. 

Key Findings

·         When asked to state whether they had purchased products in any of eight general categories (beverages, personal care, etc.) during their most recent store visit, all 200 GeoLocated respondents named one or more categories. Not one of them selected the “Don’t know/Can’t remember” option.
·         That contrasts with 28% of the non-GeoLocated control group who said they could not remember which product categories they’d purchased during their most recent store visit.

·         There were also significant gaps when it came to recalling the brands our respondents had bought. The GeoLocated group had a brand recall advantage for 13 of 16 specific product types.

·         Notable brand recall gaps include differences of 23.8% for facial cleansers, 14.1% for juices, 13.4% for feminine hygiene products, 12.3% for shampoos/conditioners, and 10.1% for snack chips.

Conclusion 

Talking to consumers when an experience is fresh in mind is crucial for obtaining accurate data about any kind of experience. Exploiting GeoLocation and other key smartphone features takes you as close to the moment of purchasing truth as you can get without tagging along in person. This is why a Point of Emotion® response, capturing data the moment when information is at its most memorable, is the most reliable way to understand what consumers really think. 

To learn more about how to keep your research from falling into the recall gap, just reach out by clicking sales@mfour.com. And be sure to check the MFour blog throughout the week for more insights from this study.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Malcolm Gladwell, Authenticity & The Trump Era

In our profession, those who can foretell market trends will always embody a competitive edge.
In the last 15 years, we've built TMRE: The Market Research Event into the Market Research & Insights industry's number one opportunity to learn from and network with the brightest, boldest thought leaders in our industry.

This October, we're thrilled to present the most well-curated TMRE ever - with tons of all-new, trend-worthy topics, speakers and sessions that smash the mold!


Here's what we'll be buzzing about at TMRE 2017:

·         Superstar author Malcolm Gladwell reveals how embracing technology has helped him forge new connections with his audience - and what those lessons can teach our evolving industry.
·         The new U.S. administration has created unforeseen realities and risks for brands, with "authenticity" emerging as a buzzword of the year. Peter Horst, former Chief Marketing Officer, The Hershey Company. helps leaders navigate this changing environment in Marketing in the Trump Age.
·         Introducing the Breakthrough Technology Start-Up Showcase, a chance to meet the biggest and most disruptive industry start-ups, while networking with the leaders who'll shape our industry for years to come.
·         Brand-new for TMRE 2017, we've partnered with Women in Research (WiRE) to present the Women in Research Awards, honoring outstanding female industry leaders, movers and shakers. 

Request the TMRE 2017 Brochure: https://goo.gl/HkCp3u

And that's not all!

·         All New! Future-proof yourself at TMRE 2017's Industry Specific Days
·         All New! Discover what today's C-Suite really wants to hear at the Chief Marketing Officer Forum
·         1,100+ international executives & thought leaders
·         150+ speakers & 120+ content-driven sessions!
·         65% client-side attendance!

TMRE is the premier event for Market Research and Consumer Insights thought leaders - an unparalleled opportunity to jump-start your career, build an all-star network and invigorate your brand.

Use exclusive blog discount code TMRE17BL for $100 off the current rate: 

Cheers,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE

#TMREvent 

Thursday, April 20, 2017

4 Best Practices for Optimizing Packaging for E-Commerce

This post was originally published on PRS IN VIVO’s blog.

How a new design system is introduced in market can significantly influence sales.  Here are four “best practices for minimizing risk:

1. Foster Brand Recognition (via Visual Continuity)

First and foremost, shoppers are looking for reassurance that they are buying the same product (online) that they know/trust from the “brick-and-mortar” store.  So while pack images may be simplified for Web “thumbnails,” it is important that they retain the brand’s core visual equities and appearance.

2. Ensure High-Quality & Informative Visuals

Simply put, some packages – particularly white packs and/or those that rely on foil, holograms and other tactile elements – do not always translate well to e-commerce environments and need refinements.  In addition, a range of images (primary vs. secondary packaging, etc.) may be necessary to illustrate the functionality and benefits of new packaging formats.


3. Clearly Convey/Reassure on Quantity

In the digital context, size impressions can be very misleading.  Therefore, it is very important to provide clear reassurance on pack sizing and quantity, particularly to highlight larger sizes.

4. Leverage Digital Capabilities to Illustrate/Inform 

Perhaps most importantly, the e-commerce context provides opportunities to inform/educate shoppers that are typically unavailable in physical environments.  For example, one click can provide a clear explanation of a full product line, helping shoppers find the right product for their needs – or link to a video illustrate use of a new product.

For more information about adopting packaging for e-commerce, please read this article here.  Or contact PRS IN VIVO to learn more about our research on the intersection of digital and physical shopping.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Insights Interview: Thomas Kralik, VP of Campaign ROI, Revolt TV

In our recent insights interview, we sat down with Thomas Kralik, VP of Campaign ROI, Revolt  to discuss how to reach the new age media consumer.

Here’s what Kralik had to say:

What is the state of the media research industry in 2017?

Kralik: The research industry is an exciting place to be in 2017. It is a place where a researcher must be fluent, not only in measurement, but understanding the consumers media habits and lifestyles.

What have been the biggest changes in the industry since you started your career? 

Kralik: It used to be that a media company could put a program on the air, promote it to a demographic, and get viewers to watch. Today, the media industry is being led by the consumer based on their habits and lifestyles. This provides opportunities to a media company because it can engage consumers via social, digital, linear, throughout the entire day These tools need to be used to establish an emotional connection with the consumer.


Have the influx of social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?

Kralik: It’s neither harder nor easier, but different. Social, linear and digital work in tandem, so research has to be involved throughout the process from conception to execution.

How has the media consumer changed in the past few years?

Consumers are in charge. New technologies have given them opportunities to access content anytime, anywhere. Consumers can now design their “packages” based on their habits and needs.

How can media companies do a better job reaching the new age consumer?

Media companies need to be completely abreast of new technologies and how and why they are used. They need to be very deliberate in how they combine and execute content.

What is the biggest challenge in the media industry today?

Coming up with an agreed upon methodology for measurement that is accepted by the industry.

Where do you see media research moving in 5 years?


Technology and consumers must determine that, but I could see viewership and measurement moving closer to a digital measurement than linear.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar Series!

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar Series!

TMRE ON DEMAND
As insights leaders, we are constantly tasked with evolving our skill sets and staying on top of the latest MR trends.


The producers of TMRE: The Market Research event are excited to announce that we’ll be delivering the cutting-edge content and speakers to keep you informed year-round. The TMRE webinar series takes you beyond the in-person event, and is designed for executives with a relentless focus on securing the future of insights as a powerful force for business success. Each quarter, the TMRE Webinar series delivers a 3-part webinar experience designed to empower insights executives with the latest information around hot topics to ensure insights drives bottom line impact.

Schedule of WEBINARS:

STORYTELLING WITH DATA
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 – 2:00 – 3:30 PM EST
Driving the value of insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this 3-part webinar focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling story. 
               
THE NEED FOR SPEED: BALANCING SPEED OF INSIGHT WITH QUALITY OF INSIGHTS
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 2:00 - 3:30 PM EST
There is a constant tug of war within insights and research departments. Your internal end-users want things done quickly and cheaply. While career market researches want to ensure they are using the savviest tools and techniques, and not just will get the job done first. This 3-part webinar focuses on how to balance speed and quality.

DEMYSTIFYING THE MILLENNIAL MINDSET
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 – 2:00 – 3:30 PM EST
Millennials are currently the largest purchasing base, but remain one of the biggest mysteries for companies looking to understand the “why” behind their actions and anticipate future needs. This 3-part webinar focuses on MR in the on-demand mindset and generate impactful insights that create brands/products around a purpose that speaks to millennials.